ACEA

ACEA, Association of European Automotive Manufacturers The Association was established in 1991 with the participation of the 14 largest European vehicle manufacturers (BMW, DAF, Fiat, Ford, GM, MAN, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, PSA, Renault, Rolls-Royce, Scania, VW, and Volvo). The performance rating system created by ACEA was introduced in 1996, after the earlier European CCMC system ceased to be effective. ACEA differentiates three engine oil categories:

  • Otto-engine cars: A
  • Diesel-powered cars and vans: B
  • Diesel-powered commercial vehicles: E

The latest performance rating system, revised in 2002, is as follows:

ACEA performance levels valid from 2002 for petrol-driven passenger car engines

A2-96 Issue 3 Standard gasoline category. For operation with normal change intervals and loads, requirements unchanged since 1996.
A3-02 Stable viscosity (stay in grade) category with stricter requirements. For high-power engines with long oil change intervals approved by the manufacturer.
A1-02 Energy-saving, catalyzer-friendly category with stricter requirements. Developed especially for low-friction engines, low viscosity (2.9 mPas < HTHS < 3.5 mPas) engine oil.
Not for use with certain engine types.
A4 -xx Category to be introduced for gasoline direct injection Otto engines with lean-mixture operating capability.
A5-02  Energy-saving, stable viscosity (stay in grade) category with stricter requirements. Developed especially for high specific power engines operating with low friction, low viscosity (2.9 mPas < HTHS < 3.5 mPas) engine oil. Suitable for long oil change intervals approved by the manufacturer.
Not for use with certain engine types.

ACEA performance levels valid from 2002 for diesel-engine passenger car and transport vehicle engines

B2-98 Issue 2 Standard diesel category. Requirements unchanged since 1998.
B3-98 Issue 2 Stable viscosity (stay in grade) category with stricter requirements. Recommended for high-performance engines and/or under heavy working conditions. Suitable for long oil change intervals approved by the manufacturer.
B1-02 Energy-saving and catalyzer-friendly category with stricter requirements. Developed specially for low-friction engines, low viscosity (2.9 mPas < HTHS < 3.5 mPas) engine oil.
Not for use with certain engine types.
B4-02 Stable viscosity (stay in grade) energy-saving category oil complying with strict bench test requirements and developed for high-pressure direct injection (DI) engines.
Suitable for long oil change intervals approved by the manufacturer and performance under heavy working conditions.
B5-02 Stable viscosity (stay in grade) category oil complying with strict test-bench requirement and developed for high-pressure direct injection (DI) engines. Developed especially for low-friction engines, low viscosity (2.9 mPas < HTHS < 3.5 mPas) engine oil.
Suitable for long oil change intervals approved by the manufacturer.
Not for use with certain engine types.

Note: Due to their viscosity characteristics, the ACEA A1, A5 and B1, B5 engine oils should be used only for engines specified by the manufacturer. Follow the specifications of the vehicle`s operating instructions or contact the dealer for assistance.

ACEA performance levels valid from 2002 for diesel engines of commercial vehicles

E2-96 Issue 4 Standard engine oil category with requirements unchanged since 1996.
E3-96 Issue 4 Stricter category than E2, basically for EURO II engines with a normal oil change interval.
E4-99 Issue 2 Stable viscosity (stay in grade) category complying with stricter requirements than those of E3, and also suitable for long service periods. For lubricating engines complying with EURO II and III emission requirements and operating under heavy working conditions.
E5-02 Stay in grade, advanced engine oil category that meets more test-bench requirements (Mack T-9, Cummins M11) than E4, developed for EGR type engines and suitable for long oil change periods.

 

General characteristics of the ACEA European performance system:

  • Classification system formulated by an organisation representing automobile manufacturers.
  • The performance categories are based on test methods that provide a realistic model of European operating conditions.
  • Only laboratories accredited by the Association may perform test bench classification.
  • The engine oil distributors are held legally accountable for the authenticity of stated performance levels.